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Market Research Group

Público·80 miembros
Nicholas Mitchell
Nicholas Mitchell

Exploratory Factor Analysis.pdf



The Severe Asthma Questionnaire (SAQ) is a health related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire validated for use in severe asthma. It is scored using the mean value of 16 items (SAQ score) in addition to a single item global rating of HRQoL (SAQ-global). The aim was to validate clinically relevant subscales using exploratory factor analysis (EFA).




Exploratory Factor Analysis.pdf



The SAQ was completed, along with measures of asthma control and EQ5D-5L by patients attending six UK severe asthma centres. Clinical data were included in the analysis. EFA using principal axis factoring and oblimin rotation was used to achieve simple structure of data.


There are two main forms of data extract: principal component analysis and factor analysis. Principal component analysis is a simpler and older form of analysis that became popular when computers were slower and is the default option in many statistical packages. Principal component analysis is a method of data reduction only, it does not distinguish between unique and shared variance and therefore does not identify causal factors (psychological constructs). The method risks overestimating variance. Factor analysis analyses only shared variance and in so doing provides information about underlying causal structures, it does not inflate estimates of variance and for most purposes is the recommended form of extraction [20]. We used factor analysis rather than principal component extraction because we wanted to identify causal constructs and estimate variance, and we used principal axis factor analysis as a commonly used type of factor analysis [20].


EFA is an exploratory tool that provides choice in the numbers of factors to be extracted. When used for subscale construction in HRQoL, the primary determinant of factor number and hence subscale number is a number that is both theoretically plausible and clinically useful. If that number produces a simple structure (see later), then that number can be accepted as the final solution. If that number fails to produce a simple structure, then alternatives should be considered. In our case, a plausible and useful number based on content is that there should be three factors, corresponding to activity, emotion and extra-pulmonary symptoms.


Once the number of factors is set, principal axis factoring coupled with rotation provides a solution capable of interpretation. The technique of rotation can be done either by forcing the factors to be uncorrelated (called orthogonal rotation, e.g., varimax) or allowing the factors to be correlated (called oblique rotation, e.g., oblimin, promax), each type of orthogonal or oblique rotation having slightly different properties. Orthogonal rotation should be used only when uncorrelated factors are predicted on theoretical grounds or when there is evidence from an earlier oblique rotation that the factors are largely uncorrelated. Varimax (i.e., orthogonal) rotation became popular through its use in psychology where there was a theoretical requirement for personality factors to be uncorrelated [22], but this form of rotatio